Convenience Store News

NOV 2014

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26 Store of the Future | WWW.CSNEWS.COM authorize a transaction at the pump. In addition, driv- ers will receive personalized promotions in their car based on their user profile — if they are part of a loy- alty program, so much the better. The driver will also be able to use the car's touchscreen to purchase addi- tional items from the convenience store and to even make payment from the driver's seat. According to Nielsen's Connected Life Report, of the 44 percent of future auto intenders who plan to purchase a new car within the next two years, 39 per- cent are very likely to purchase a connected car with built-in features. Sixty percent of these future auto intenders say they'd like a connected car because they want to experience emerging technologies, 58 percent feel it will provide entertainment to passengers while on the road, and 43 percent say it will boost their pro- ductivity while they're on the road. The rise in connectivity options — whether for get- ting directions or checking engine diagnostics — also presents a unique opportunity for advertisers and mar- heat almost commonplace. Google Glass is already positioning itself as the next evolution of the cell phone, said Rogers. Networked automobiles that drive themselves will change the way consumers drive, park, refuel, and make food and other purchases. Rogers has already tried out a prototype of the Google car and thinks automotive vehicles connected by Wi-Fi and dedicated to car-to-car and car-to-network will be coming in 2017. Enrique (Rick) Sales, president of Abierto Networks, a Maine-based company that specializes in digital marketing solutions and high-speed payments for the c-store and retail petroleum industry, told CSNews he's convinced that despite all the technologi- cal changes, the convenience channel will always be a brick-and-mortar channel. He pointed to work being done by SAP in partner- ship with Toyota to develop the connected car. SAP, Toyota InfoTechnology Center USA (Toyota ITC) and VeriFone piloted a solution, which will help to dramat- ically simplify drivers' fueling experience, Sales said. With the prototype, consumers can use a one-touch, one-screen solution to navigate to the closest gas sta- tion, authorize automatic payment electronically and receive personalized coupons. So even if cars aren't literally driving themselves, they will still provide a new way for consumers to interact with convenience stores/gas stations. For example, using a touchscreen on the car's dashboard, the driver will be able to pull into a gas station and How Important Is Connected Car Technology to Consumers? (Among connected car users who use safety alert features) Automatic crash notification and emergency roadside assistance Internet-enabled navigation Safety alerts Vehicle maintenance/repair diagnostics Using your car as a wireless hotspot Driving analytics Entertainment connectivity Remote control capabilities Communication In 2014, of connected car users who utilize the safety alerts feature, 51 percent said this technology is very important. Source: Nielsen 64% 58% 30% 10% 2% 51% 32% 13% 3% 51% 32% 12% 2% 47% 32% 16% 4% 45% 38% 12% 3% 45% 33% 16% 4% 42% 39% 15% 3% 35% 43% 17% 5% 25% 8% 2% Very Important Somewhat Important Neutral Not Very Important keters to reach consumers in the comfort of their own cockpits, the Nielsen report noted. Gorlov of Petrosoft concluded: " When you consider that personal wearable devices have sensors and a car has an average of 60 to 100 sensors, how a customer chooses to connect the data that these devices are collecting to c-store systems pro- vides a wide window of opportunity for the customer, c-store operator and the industry's supply chain." As illustrated in many of the Store of the Future prototypes presented in this special edition, technology will be a key enabler, providing the digital agility needed to survive in the ever-changing land- scape of the c-store industry. CSN Google is developing a self-driving car. The latest prototype had neither a steering wheel nor pedals.

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