Single Store Owner

JAN-FEB 2016

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the hub 14 / Convenience Store News for the Single Store Owner / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016 S t o r e O w n e r / J A N U A R Y / F E B T his new year calls for a new take on fresh foodservice, especially for independent convenience stores who might be misinformed as to how to become a fresh food destination. Dispelling Myth #1: Weekly Works Perhaps the most important myth to dispel is this: You don't need multiple deliveries per week to be solidly in the fresh business. Surprised? So were many NACS Show attendees this past October, according to Sharon Kuncl, vice president of merchandising, foodservice, at conve- nience distributor Eby-Brown Co. LLC. She sat on a fresh foodservice panel in Las Vegas in front of a packed, "standing-room-only" crowd. One of the big discussions revolved around how many deliveries per week a c-store needs to receive in order to be in the fresh business. "It's important for single-store owners to understand you don't necessarily need multiple deliveries per week to be in the fresh business," Kuncl told Convenience Store News for the Single Store Owner. "As a distributor, we know that many stores only get deliveries once a week. There are a lot of products available with at least a seven-day shelf life at the time of delivery. Items such as deli sandwiches, deli salads, fruit cups and veggie trays all are applicable items for once- per-week delivery locations. It's imperative that store owners understand who's shopping their stores and how they can be a fresh destination." One of the initial messages Eby-Brown likes to convey to potential "fresh" retailers is that "fresh" is really a buzzword, and it means something different to everyone out there. "Retailers can present a great fresh assort- ment by merchandising multiple items to- gether," Kuncl said. This can mean putting yogurt, cheese sticks, fruit cups and veggie snack trays in one destination location. It sends a message to cus- tomers that the store has the fresh items consumers want, while at the same time being manageable with a weekly delivery, especially with the technology of MAP (modi- fied atmosphere processing) packaging. If and when a convenience store wants to get deeper into fresh, chances are it will have to increase the frequency of delivery, reasoned Tim Barry, corporate director of fresh and foodservice for convenience distributor Core-Mark International Inc. He cited the example of a c-store that's buy- ing fresh sandwiches with a six-day shelf life, leaving one day in the hole. "We can fix that. We will work with retailers to get them sandwiches seven days a week, if that's what you determine your store can sustain," Dishing on Fresh Solutions Top c-store industry distributors dispel myths around becoming a fresh food destination BY RENĂ©E M. CoviNo McLane Kitchen is one of three fresh/foodservice programs offered by McLane.

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